Training with Integrity

Via Tabatatimes.com
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“So what does training with integrity look like?

I distinctly remember struggling up a rope during a workout and I just wanted to call it good at the halfway mark. I knew I could make it to the top, but it would take me a little bit of time and it was hard. I asked myself if I was pursuing excellence in that moment… and I finished that rope climb. It did take me a a bit of time; I was the last one to finish. But I had committed myself to doing what I was capable of doing and not selling myself short because it was difficult and uncomfortable. And I was so proud of myself afterwards! Struggling through that and being successful was a great feeling, even if it was a very slow process.

Are you asking the best of yourself in training? Are you pursuing excellence? Are you throwing a weight around with terrible form and counting that as a rep? Are you selling yourself short, or are you challenging yourself?

Are you allowing yourself to struggle every now and then? In training, as in life, there is no growth in your comfort zone. Pursuing excellence demands that you get uncomfortable. This will look different for everyone, but it is a necessary part of the process. 

The path to excellence goes through discomfort, embarrassment, and humbling experiences. It is a struggle. Success does not often come easily.

It means pushing yourself in the gym, leaving your ego at the door, asking for help, and putting your pride aside. Going light and perfecting technique. One of my favorite phrases in regards to lifting is “light and right is better than strong and wrong.” Don’t let what you think you should be able to do take precedence over what you can actually do safely and with proper form. On the flip side, if you can lift a heavier weight (safely, with good form) and you don’t simply because it is hard is also doing a disservice to your training.

Training with integrity means being consistently asking the best of yourself. Never getting complacent. Executing proper form with light weights and with heavy weights. Focusing on quality over quantity. I don’t care that you can do 100 reps of whatever weight with terrible form. You don’t look like a badass. And you won’t look like a badass in rehab either. Not only should bad reps not count, but they also have the potential to damage your body. Training with integrity often involves no-repping yourself as part of a commitment to quality. Especially when no one else is watching.” Continued…

 

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